Entries by Bridget Waller

High Tech Solutions Benefit Family Caregivers and Their Senior Loved Ones

Today’s seniors are inundated with an incredible quantity of high-tech products geared toward increasing their independence and safety, while offering life enhancement. With the touch of a button or two, we can immediately pay a visit “in person” with family and friends through video conferencing, wear a necklace that takes action with emergency help when needed, and even remain safe from getting lost with specialized receptors adhered to clothes or shoes. Read More...

6 Crisis Resources to Help Seniors and Caregivers Through the COVID-19 Pandemic

Recognizing the best place to turn with regard to the latest, most reliable info on COVID-19, particularly as it relates to the elderly and family caregivers who provide care assistance for them, is important – and can be difficult. Because of so many crisis resources and different opinions on this extraordinary subject, we wanted to help make it simpler to locate what you need by compiling the subsequent list of reliable resources.

AARP Answers Commonly Asked Questions About COVID-19: AARP provides an ongoing bulleted list of all of the current updates pertaining to COVID-19, plus what older adults can do to lower their likelihood of contracting it and answers to several common questions. Read More...

The Benefits of Exercise for Parkinson’s Patients

The results of maintaining some form of exercise regimen throughout aging are tremendous; however, for persons with Parkinson’s, it might truly be a game-changer. Several studies are revealing direct links between exercise for Parkinson’s patients and the progression of the disease, such as the largest clinical study up to now, in which patients who exercised at least 2½ hours per week gained a greater total wellbeing compared to those who refrained from physical activity. Read More...

Tips for Managing Dementia and Incontinence

Dementia care calls for both compassion and creativity to deal with an assortment of challenging behaviors and effects, and that is particularly true with regards to incontinence, something that is exceedingly common in Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. These tried-and-true approaches are generally helpful in lessening the effect of incontinence and protecting against an escalation of emotions in someone you adore with Alzheimer’s disease.

Pick your words very carefully. Read More...

Heart Surgery Recovery: Guidelines to Help Bring Healing and Comfort

Every day, thousands of heart surgeries take place across the United States. From open heart surgery to valve repair, there are a variety of procedures available to help people maintain an active lifestyle in spite of a cardiac event.
And while there may be some apprehension in leaving the watchful eyes of the hospital staff following heart surgery, returning to the comfort of home can bring a particular peace of mind. Read More...

10 Ways Home Care Services Make Life Better for Seniors

It’s an undeniable fact: the overwhelming majority of today’s older individuals would rather age at home instead of facing a move to a nursing home or assisted living facility. And with good rationale: home care services allow older adults to experience safety and stability, while retaining the comfort and familiarity of home and their neighborhood community. Read More…

7 Key Signs of Diabetes You Need to Know

All seniors, and those who care for them, should be alert to the symptoms and signs of diabetes, since as many as one out of every four adults over the age of 60 are currently living with diabetes. Diabetes requires ongoing treatment and careful management over the course of a lifetime; if diabetes care is neglected, it can eventually lead to serious and deadly health concerns, including heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, amputations, and many others. Read More...

How to Start a Conversation With a Parent About the Benefits of Home Care

Accepting the truth that an aging loved one requires help at home can be tough. Even harder is speaking about the need for care with the older adult and getting him or her to acknowledge that assistance is warranted. If you have noticed changes in a loved one and you’re sensing the need to begin a discussion about the benefits of home care as a choice to maintain safety and independence in the home, try these conversation starters to raise the subject in a subtle, non-confrontational way.

If heightened frailty is becoming a concern:

“I love you, Dad, and now that you live alone, I’m concerned about your safety. Read More...